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9 Serious Eye Symptoms to Watch Out For

Routine eye exams are critical to maintaining your vision health. Early detection is crucial to avoiding serious and permanent damage from correctable eye conditions such as cataracts and glaucoma. While annual eye exams can detect and treat these progressive eye conditions, you may experience symptoms that require immediate attention such as blurry vision or eye pain.

If you experience any of the following symptoms, be sure to seek medical attention immediately:

Eye Floaters, Flashes, or Shadows in Your Vision

Beware if you experience a gray shadow in your peripheral vision, a gray curtain that appears across your line of sight, a sudden onset of flashing lights, or a significant increase in the amount of eye floaters: these could all be signs of a detached retina. The retina is the thin nerve layer at the back of the eye that sends images to the brain via the optic nerve. Physical injury to the eye, diseases like glaucoma, and nearsightedness can all lead to retinal detachment. Retinal detachment needs to be surgically treated, or else it can lead to blindness.

One Red Eye

If both of your eyes are red, you have most likely contracted a cold or conjunctivitis, which is a relatively harmless inflammation. However, if just one of your eyes is red, it may be an indication of a more severe eye infection such as scleritis or uveitis. Scleritis is the inflammation of the outer protective barrier surrounding the eye. Uveitis is the inflammation of the middle coating of the eye. Both of these infections are serious, and require antibiotics or medicated eye drops to clear up.

Blurry Vision

Blurry vision can signal numerous eye disorders, from a torn retina to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In addition, blurred or loss of vision in one eye can be an early indicator of a stroke. Blurred vision in one eye can also indicate that the carotid artery, which is a major supplier of blood to the eye, is blocked.

Any Loss of Vision

Sudden vision loss could be a sign of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). While this is usually considered a progressive disorder, it can develop quickly in some cases. The loss of vision can also indicate a certain kind of glaucoma.

Eye Pain

Eye pain may be a symptom of glaucoma, dry eye, eye injury, and even eye cancer.

Discomfort Wearing Contact Lenses

Contact lenses that are not cared for properly can lead to serious eye infections. If you experience eye discomfort while wearing contact lenses, consult your eye care professional.

Eye Injury

Any eye injury should be examined by an ophthalmologist, especially if you experience redness or pain for longer than 20 minutes thereafter.

Persistent Irritation

If you experience persistent eye irritation after exposure to harsh chemicals, such as when cleaning, see a doctor immediately.

Eye Surgery Complications

If you experience any redness, pain, or blurry vision after having an eye surgery, contact an eye doctor immediately for an evaluation.

If you or a loved one experience any of these symptoms, schedule an examination with Dr. Ghosheh immediately.

Are You Nearsighted or Farsighted?

Two of the most common eyesight problems are nearsightedness and farsightedness. Both conditions can cause long-term vision impairment and are considered refractive disorders. Also known as myopia, nearsightedness causes objects that are far away to be viewed as blurry. Farsightedness, know as hyperopia, causes nearby objects to appear blurred. Both conditions, which are very common, are caused by an elongation of the eyeballs, that occurs naturally with age, and prolonged use of the eyes, but also can be genetic among children.

Keep in mind that when you are either nearsighted or farsighted, you are only affected to a certain extent. Because myopia and hyperopia occur on different levels, this will also affect your prescription for either eyeglasses, contact lenses or both. While only a medical professional will be able to determine and diagnose if you are near-sighted or far-sighted , there are ways to tell what your particular refractive disorder you have. Here are the best ways to determine if you are near-sighted or far-sighted.

How To Tell If You’re Near-Sighted

Pediatricians regularly have children read a sequence of shrinking letters off a chart in their offices for this specific reason. You’re probably familiar with this test. These charts are called a Snellen or Tumbling E -chart. Fortunately, the test associated with these charts can be found online, although a medical professional can only make the final diagnosis. If you are unable to determine the sequencing of letters on the chart, in a readable order, it is possible that you have myopia.

How To Tell If You’re Far-Sighted

Determining if you are far-sighted also involves the same method of testing. To test yourself for this refractive disorder, you will need to find an online, sight-testing, chart where the texts in each line appears smaller. An eye with normal focusing ability should be able to read each individual line without experience any blurriness or discomfort. If you are unable to do so, you may hyperopia, and should seek a medical eye exam immediately to determine if you need reading glasses. If you do, a true medical examination will be able to not only determine whether you have hyperopia, but also what strength of reading glasses you will need. Luckily, being far-sighted is the less serious and more common of the two conditions, but both the onset of myopia and hyperopia can be corrected with proper eyeglasses or contact lenses as prescribed by a medical professional.

If you are experiencing any eye-sight issues, feel free to Dr. Ghosheh, today, at 1-888-439-6565. To schedule a consultation, or appointment, go to laserforeyes.com.

Top 10 Questions On Eye Health Answered

As an often neglected aspect of general health and wellness, eye health is essential not only for vision, but also for daily and general activity. Within eye health, lay many misconceptions and unknown factors in regard to eye exams, eye condition, and illnesses associated with the eyes. That being in mind, here are ten common questions about eye health and their corresponding answers.

1.How Often Should You Have an Eye Exam?

According to the American Optometric Association, adults that are aged 61 and above should see their optometrist every year, if they are currently using glasses or contact lenses. However, adults 60 or younger are typically only required to have an eye examination every two years, although their optometrist might recommend a more frequent checkup, depending on the severity of their eye condition.

2.What is a cataract?

Despite being one of the most common eye conditions, cataracts are largely misunderstood, both in how they are acquired and what treatment is available. A cataract is a cloudy film that develops in your eye that prevents light from passing into your retina which, if left untreated, can impair your vision. Cataract removal is one of the most common mandatory surgeries in the United States once the condition is discovered.

3.What is the difference being nearsighted and farsighted?

Also known as myopia, nearsightedness causes objects, that are far away, to be viewed blurry. Farsightedness is also known as hyperopia, which causes nearby objects to appear blurred. Both conditions – which are very common, are caused an elongation of the eyeballs that occurs with age.

4.Do you need a prescription to purchase eyeglasses or contact lenses?

It is necessary to have a prescription when purchasing prescription eyeglasses, and contact lenses, as they need to be adjusted specifically for your eyes and vision. Contact lens or eyeglasses that are fitted incorrectly can cause blurred or distorted vision, infection, inflammation or permanent eye tissue damage if used continuously, which is why a prescription is required.

5.How safe is LASIK eye surgery?

While all surgery necessitates some level of risk, LASIK laser eye surgery is considered particularly safe and noninvasive. Possible side effects include dry eye syndrome, the need to wear eyeglasses or contact lenses after surgery, or seeing halos or glares due to over correction or under correction of eye tissue. Loss of vision is also a possible risk, although this is thought to be quite rare.

6.How do you know if you have glaucoma?

Unfortunately, glaucoma is not detectable outside of specialized tests by medical professionals, and will only become apparent once there is damage to your optic nerve. This is why regular preventative eye examinations are recommended, as glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 65.

7.Can you develop both cataracts and glaucoma simultaneously?

While cataracts and glaucoma affect different areas of the eye, both can occur at the same time. Both cataracts and glaucoma are onset by aging, although contracting one does not increase your risk to contract the other. However, there are some exceptions, and those concerned should consult a medical professional.

8.Can you prevent hyperopia or myopia?

Unfortunately, neither condition is preventable, although they are both treatable through either prescription eyeglasses and contact lenses or LASIK laser surgery. Both conditions are a result of a defect in the eye, which makes the light entering the eye focus incorrectly. However, myopia can be made worse by intensely focusing on close blurred objects for extended periods of time.

9.What are dry eyes?

Dry eye syndrome is a condition that alters the quality, or quantity, of tears that leak out of your eyes. These tears are made up of three different layers that are balance to keep your eyes nourished and lubricated. If anything changes the balance of these three layers, your tears will evaporate too quickly, which, in turn, will cause your eyes to become chronically puffy and irritated. This can be caused by a combination of age, medications and environmental factors. This can be treated by adding artificial tears, other medications, and consuming more water and other nutrients.

10.What is macular degeneration?

While glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 65, macular degeneration is the leading cause. Unlike glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration is often slow and painless, and there is no cure, although treatment can slow or in some cases keep the process at bay. Macular degeneration is caused by the deterioration of the central portion of the retina, which blocks imaging from the brain to the eye. It is an all too common condition that affects more people than both glaucoma and cataracts combined, and is estimated to affect more than 10 million Americans.

For more information on the health of your eyes or to schedule an appointment, contact Dr. Ghosheh at, 1-888-439-6565, today.

Why is iLASIK Better than Regular Lasik Surgery?

When it comes to something as precious as your vision, it’s only natural to want the best. This undeniably remains the case when venturing to improve it with surgery. However, quite frankly, not every vision correction technique is made equal. By comparing iLASIK with traditional LASIK surgery, it’s easy to see that one procedure has several advantages over the other . Here’s a hint; it isn’t LASIK… and here’s why:

iLASIK is Bladeless:

No blades used, need we say more? Probably not, but let’s expand on that anyway. Using a laser system, called IntraLase, iLASIK creates a corneal flap with more precision and safety than LASIK, which uses a small bladed instrument called a microkeratome.

Fewer Complications:

While complications with regular LASIK were fairly rare, the absence of blades, combined with the innovation of advanced technologies, has made iLASIK largely considered the safer of the two. The laser’s exact measurements, capabilities, and predictable outcomes, offer reduced chances of complications such as partial or incomplete corneal flaps.

It’s a Custom-Fit Treatment:

In order to detect the tiniest irregularities and imperfections of the eyes, iLASIK makes a 3D map using WaveScan technology. After the customized flap is created, the map is then utilized when making the appropriate corrections. Not to mention, by being able to treat a wider range of imperfections, such as severe nearsightedness (myopia), iLASIK is possible for a greater amount of people. This, of course, includes those who were not necessarily ideal candidates for traditional LASIK. Overall, it’s a fair to say that iLASIK is a more advanced, more personalized way of improving vision, than that of its predecessor, which is comparatively closer to a one-size fits all technique.

Better Vision Results:

Last, but certainly not least, iLASIK has offered better results, with a majority of patients achieving 20/20 vision, or even better.

Seeing the Benefits of Clearer Vision

Utilized by the United States military and NASA, iLASIK has proven itself to be a highly effective method of vision correction. From precision to safety, the reasons for choosing this procedure are crystal clear, and those for traditional LASIK well, a bit foggy.

To learn more about iLASIK and how it can address your specific vision needs, contact us at Advanced Eye Medical in Orange County. Our expert staff of optometrists and ophthalmologists take pride in helping patients. Say so long to contacts and glasses, and say hello to a clearer world!