Monovision Correction

The Benefits of Monovision Correction

If you struggle with close-up vision, you may benefit from monovision correction. Monovision correction is a way to treat an eye condition that occurs quite commonly: presbyopia. With this eye condition, people have issues seeing objects from up close.

Your eye doctor can come up with an individualized plan that works for your vision. Whether that is a contact lens fitting or corrective surgery, there are many solutions that can improve your quality of life.

The Different Types of Monovision Correction

Correction of your vision with monovision can be expensive and take up more time than a regular contact lens fitting. With a typical monovision lens fitting, your eye doctor will prescribe one contact lens to be used for seeing at a closer distance, and the other from a distance. If you find that this works for you, the need for additional reading glasses becomes less common and can be convenient in your lifestyle. Carrying around different pairs of glasses and knowing which ones to use at which time can be confusing, with adjusting your vision with monovision correction being less of a hassle for the patient.

Here are other methods that can be beneficial for correcting your vision with monovision:

  • Computer-monovision: Computer-monovision uses less magnification in the eye for seeing things from up close. As a result, patients are able to view objects from a mid-level distance (like the distance they are from a computer screen). However, for everyday tasks such as reading a book, they may still need their set of reading glasses. This type of monovision solution works well for people who do a lot of computer work daily, and want to improve their vision.
  • Modified monovision: In this method, patients will wear one bifocal contact lens on the weaker eye. This helps with close-up vision, and will improve depth perception and distance vision.
  • Surgical monovision: LASIK surgery can be a permanent solution to contacts that adjusts one of the eyes for seeing far-away, and the other from up close. The surgery entails work done on the cornea, and has a fast recovery time with noticeable differences happening right away. This type of surgery is done on the cornea, and people who undergo LASIK surgery usually heal quickly and see a change in their vision right away.

Is Monovision Correction Right for You?

When you see your eye doctor and try out your new solutions, you’ll notice that you will rely on your reading glasses less, but you may not have as much clarity or depth perception with your vision.

Other issues reported from people with monovision correction is that even though you can see better from up close and far away, it is still not as clear is it could be. Some patients also struggle with the loss of their depth perception, and it may interfere with their profession or daily life. Monovision correction can also be an expensive and time consuming investment if you are considering the contact lens method.

However, most patients we see feel, overall, that monovision correction works well for them and is worth the investment. LASIK surgery can be an especially effective solution that remains permanent and hassle-free. Surgery is always a major decision so be sure to consult with your eye doctor if you think this type of mono vision correction is right for you.

We hope to see you soon at Dr. Ghosheh Advanced Eye Medical! We encourage our patients to get in touch with us if they have any questions or concerns, or want to know about the latest on monovision correction.

Why Do I Have Eye Floaters?

Eye Floaters: The Causes and What You Can Do

Ever experience small specks or clouds moving in your field of vision? These are called eye floaters. You can often see them when looking at a plain background, like a blank white wall or blue sky. They can appear as black or gray dots or threadlike stands that drift about when you move your eyes and appear to dart away when you try to look at them directly.

Symptoms of Eye Floaters

Once you develop eye floaters, they usually do not go away, though they tend to improve over time. Eye floaters can appear in many different shapes, such as:

  • Black or gray dots
  • Squiggly lines
  • Threadlike strands, which can be knobby and semi-transparent
  • Cobwebs
  • Ring shaped

Contact an eye specialist immediately if you notice:

  • Many more eye floaters than usual
  • A sudden onset of new floaters
  • Flashes of light
  • Darkness on the sides of your vision (peripheral vision loss)

Causes of Eye Floaters

Eye floaters are caused by age-related changes that occur as the jelly-like substance (vitreous) inside your eye becomes more liquid. As you age, the vitreous and its millions of fine collagen fibers shrink and become shred-like. As it shrinks, this attachment to the optic nerve may release, and this former attachment floats within the eye. As a result, the back surface of the vitreous that floats within the eye casts a shadow onto the retina, producing eye floaters.

These changes can occur at any age, most often between ages 50 and 75 and for those who are very nearsighted or have had cataract surgery.

Rarely, but still possible, eye floaters can result from other eye surgeries or eye diseases, eye injuries, diabetic retinopathy, or crystal-like deposits that form in the vitreous among others.

Treatment of Eye Floaters

Benign eye floaters never require medical treatment. If they are bothersome, you can move them away from your vision by shifting your eyes. This move shifts the fluid in your eyes, and looking up and down is usually more effective than looking from side to side.

If eye floaters are so dense that they impact your vision, consult your eye doctor about a surgical procedure called a vitrectomy. During this procedure, the vitreous and its floating debris are removed and replaced with a salt solution. Risks associated with this procedure may include: retinal detachment, retinal tears, or cataracts. The likelihood of these risks is rare, but if they occur they can result in permanent damage. For this reason, most surgeons do not perform a vitrectomy unless eye floaters are causing an extraordinary visual handicap.

An alternative procedure is laser vitreolysis, a much safer alternative to a vitrectomy for eye floater treatment. In this in-office procedure, a laser beam is projected into the eye through the pupil and is targeted on large floaters. During this process, the laser beam breaks the floaters apart and vaporizes them so they disappear or become much less bothersome. Consult your doctor to determine whether this procedure is right for you. Considerations may include age, how quickly your symptoms started, what your floaters look like, and where they are located.

For patients under age 45, the floaters may be located too close to the retina and can’t be safely treated with laser vitreolysis. Patients with sizable eye floaters located farther away from the retina are ideal candidates for the procedure.

What Types of Doctor Should I Consult?

If you develop eye floaters, schedule an appointment with a professional trained in the diagnosis and treatment of eye disease. These include ophthalmologists and optometrists.

An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor who specializes in eye and vision care. They can deliver total eye care, including performing a complete eye examination, prescribing eyeglasses and contact lenses, diagnosing and treating eye diseases, and performing surgery on the eyes and areas around the eye.

An optometrist is a doctor of optometry. Licensed by the individual states to practice optometry, optometrists can perform an eye examination and can determine the presence of vision-related problems. They can also prescribe eyeglasses and contact lenses. Depending on the state they are licensed in, they may be allowed to treat eye diseases and prescribe eye drops for various conditions, but they are not trained or licensed to perform surgery.

No matter your eye health issue or the help you’re seeking, the team of ophthalmologists and optometrists at Advanced Eye Medical can help. Get in contact with us today.

What Is Amblyopia, also Known as Lazy Eye? Symptoms and Treatment

Amblyopia also known as lazy eye, is often commonly found in children. As the most often recorded visual impairment, it is often treatable and many tend to go on and live their lives with healthy vision. If you feel like your child is suffering from amblyopia, there are options for them to receive care and to live a normal life.

Causes

When a child’s brain is developing, it is extremely sensitive to how often the eyes are used. Amblyopia is often developed when one eye is not used enough and the other tends to compensate. As a result, the brain tends to rewire itself to not need the unused eye. While it is most common for young children to develop this condition at six to nine and professionals agree that attempts to correct it should be made before adolescence, those older than nine can still benefit from care.

Symptoms

Other eye conditions can often lead to amblyopia. Glaucoma has been known to damage vision and can often lead to the use of one eye over the other. Strabimus can also lead to a lazy eye since the eyes are already often crossed. Cataracts are also another issue that tends to cloud the lens of the eye and can make it difficult to see.

Many patients find out they have amblyopia once they visit their eye doctors. A routine exam is an important factor in determining whether or not your child might have problems with his or her vision. It might also be noticed by friends or family as the child gets older.

Treatment

Treatment is often easy and requires only patching the stronger eye, forcing the weaker one to do most the work and to make it easier to see through use. While your child might have difficulty seeing at first, it often doesn’t take long before the problem eye starts to adjust. Drops made of atropine are sometimes also recommended. This dilates the pupil in the good eye and makes vision fuzzy, requiring the bad eye to do most the work of seeing.

Because children are unlikely to know that there is something wrong with their vision, visiting an eye doctor at that critical age is incredibly important. Children should have an eye exam once a year in order for you to know that there aren’t any problems.

Fortunately, amblyopia is very treatable and most can go on to see well in their adulthood.

Surgery Options for Correcting Myopia

Myopia, also known as near nearsightedness, is one of the most common eye disorders. As a result, there are many options to correct myopia, including surgical procedures. These surgical procedures generally fall under the category of laser eye surgery. There are several options within laser eye surgery that can be used to correct myopia. With that in mind, here are the options that you can choose and a breakdown of their pros and cons for treating myopia.

Different Types of Laser Eye Surgery

Before laser eye surgery, doctors used a procedure called radial keratotmy to correct the symptoms of myopia. In radial keratotmy, a select number of incisions were made in the cornea to alter its shape and affect how it refracted light. Fortunately, laser eye surgery is a much more simple procedure with a much higher rate of success.

LASIK Eye Surgery

LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) is now the preferred form of laser eye surgery because it has a greater depth of treatment in comparison to traditional laser eye surgery. Recovery time on LASIK eye surgery is also quicker and the surgery can be done as an outpatient procedure if no complications occur. LASIK eye surgery is performed by a surgical instrument being used in conjunction with a laser to fold back a flap of the corena and reshape the tissue behind it to correct vision. While complications are not common, do keep in mind that LASIK eye surgery can cause damage if you have thin corneas or have had previous complications from past eye surgeries.

Photorefractive Keratectomy

Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK) is the other major option to correct myopia, and it is an extension of radial keratotmy with the addition of lasers. Prior to the widespread use of LASIK eye surgery, PRK was the standard option for elective eye surgery. PRK uses a laser directly on the surface of the cornea instead of underneath the cornea to reshape the curvature of the eye. It takes about two to three days for the cornea to heal after PRK surgery. If you have a eye condition such as dry eyes, your medical professional may opt for PRK surgery, as it is less likely to complicate existing conditions or disorders.

Ultimately, your medical professional will decide which type of laser eye surgery is the right choice for you. Make sure to heed their advice carefully during your consultation and make an informed decision about how to best clear up myopia and be able to view objects nearby without blurred vision again.

Living Well with Low Vision

Low vision is a degenerative ocular disease that causes a loss of vision that is not correctable using prescription glasses, contact lenses, medicine, or surgery. In fact, there is no medical cure at all. A person with low vision may find it difficult to accomplish everyday activities such as reading, driving and facial recognition. Although low vision in a not a normal part of the aging process, and loss of eyesight cannot be regained, there are many tools that exist so that you can live well with your remaining eyesight. With that in mind, here are some tips and tools you can use to maximize your remaining vision and live well.

Use Large Print Devices and Magnifying Glasses

Many household items and digital devices come in larger versions. These larger print versions, including books, clocks and other products, can be read more easily when the text is larger, and will be easily purchasable at any store. You can also zoom in on most web browsers, including Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome, which will make reading webpages much easier.

Use Talking Devices for the Visually Impaired

Many household items can be purchased in ‘talking versions’ for those who are visually impaired. These include watches, timers and even books in the form of audio books. Make the most of computer and electronic devices, so that everything from typing on the computer to timing dinner in the oven can be accomplished with relative ease.

Compensate With Your Other Senses

It has long been said that your other sense will start to make up for the other when it becomes somewhat unusable. For example, those will low vision can start to rely more on their hearing to make up for their comparable lack of vision, and use the feel of texture to touch their way around environments. By redesigning your home environment to adapt more to your other senses, you will be able to navigate much easier and adapt your home to your lack of coherent vision.

If you follow these tips, living with low vision won’t be nearly as big of a problem, and you will be able to live a normal and sustainable life with minimal assistance. Contact Dr. Ghosheh to set up an appointment learn about how to take care of your eyes the best way possible.

Are You Nearsighted or Farsighted?

Two of the most common eyesight problems are nearsightedness and farsightedness. Both conditions can cause long-term vision impairment and are considered refractive disorders. Also known as myopia, nearsightedness causes objects that are far away to be viewed as blurry. Farsightedness, know as hyperopia, causes nearby objects to appear blurred. Both conditions, which are very common, are caused by an elongation of the eyeballs, that occurs naturally with age, and prolonged use of the eyes, but also can be genetic among children.

Keep in mind that when you are either nearsighted or farsighted, you are only affected to a certain extent. Because myopia and hyperopia occur on different levels, this will also affect your prescription for either eyeglasses, contact lenses or both. While only a medical professional will be able to determine and diagnose if you are near-sighted or far-sighted , there are ways to tell what your particular refractive disorder you have. Here are the best ways to determine if you are near-sighted or far-sighted.

How To Tell If You’re Near-Sighted

Pediatricians regularly have children read a sequence of shrinking letters off a chart in their offices for this specific reason. You’re probably familiar with this test. These charts are called a Snellen or Tumbling E -chart. Fortunately, the test associated with these charts can be found online, although a medical professional can only make the final diagnosis. If you are unable to determine the sequencing of letters on the chart, in a readable order, it is possible that you have myopia.

How To Tell If You’re Far-Sighted

Determining if you are far-sighted also involves the same method of testing. To test yourself for this refractive disorder, you will need to find an online, sight-testing, chart where the texts in each line appears smaller. An eye with normal focusing ability should be able to read each individual line without experience any blurriness or discomfort. If you are unable to do so, you may hyperopia, and should seek a medical eye exam immediately to determine if you need reading glasses. If you do, a true medical examination will be able to not only determine whether you have hyperopia, but also what strength of reading glasses you will need. Luckily, being far-sighted is the less serious and more common of the two conditions, but both the onset of myopia and hyperopia can be corrected with proper eyeglasses or contact lenses as prescribed by a medical professional.

If you are experiencing any eye-sight issues, feel free to Dr. Ghosheh, today, at 1-888-439-6565. To schedule a consultation, or appointment, go to laserforeyes.com.

Top 10 Questions On Eye Health Answered

As an often neglected aspect of general health and wellness, eye health is essential not only for vision, but also for daily and general activity. Within eye health, lay many misconceptions and unknown factors in regard to eye exams, eye condition, and illnesses associated with the eyes. That being in mind, here are ten common questions about eye health and their corresponding answers.

1.How Often Should You Have an Eye Exam?

According to the American Optometric Association, adults that are aged 61 and above should see their optometrist every year, if they are currently using glasses or contact lenses. However, adults 60 or younger are typically only required to have an eye examination every two years, although their optometrist might recommend a more frequent checkup, depending on the severity of their eye condition.

2.What is a cataract?

Despite being one of the most common eye conditions, cataracts are largely misunderstood, both in how they are acquired and what treatment is available. A cataract is a cloudy film that develops in your eye that prevents light from passing into your retina which, if left untreated, can impair your vision. Cataract removal is one of the most common mandatory surgeries in the United States once the condition is discovered.

3.What is the difference being nearsighted and farsighted?

Also known as myopia, nearsightedness causes objects, that are far away, to be viewed blurry. Farsightedness is also known as hyperopia, which causes nearby objects to appear blurred. Both conditions – which are very common, are caused an elongation of the eyeballs that occurs with age.

4.Do you need a prescription to purchase eyeglasses or contact lenses?

It is necessary to have a prescription when purchasing prescription eyeglasses, and contact lenses, as they need to be adjusted specifically for your eyes and vision. Contact lens or eyeglasses that are fitted incorrectly can cause blurred or distorted vision, infection, inflammation or permanent eye tissue damage if used continuously, which is why a prescription is required.

5.How safe is LASIK eye surgery?

While all surgery necessitates some level of risk, LASIK laser eye surgery is considered particularly safe and noninvasive. Possible side effects include dry eye syndrome, the need to wear eyeglasses or contact lenses after surgery, or seeing halos or glares due to over correction or under correction of eye tissue. Loss of vision is also a possible risk, although this is thought to be quite rare.

6.How do you know if you have glaucoma?

Unfortunately, glaucoma is not detectable outside of specialized tests by medical professionals, and will only become apparent once there is damage to your optic nerve. This is why regular preventative eye examinations are recommended, as glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 65.

7.Can you develop both cataracts and glaucoma simultaneously?

While cataracts and glaucoma affect different areas of the eye, both can occur at the same time. Both cataracts and glaucoma are onset by aging, although contracting one does not increase your risk to contract the other. However, there are some exceptions, and those concerned should consult a medical professional.

8.Can you prevent hyperopia or myopia?

Unfortunately, neither condition is preventable, although they are both treatable through either prescription eyeglasses and contact lenses or LASIK laser surgery. Both conditions are a result of a defect in the eye, which makes the light entering the eye focus incorrectly. However, myopia can be made worse by intensely focusing on close blurred objects for extended periods of time.

9.What are dry eyes?

Dry eye syndrome is a condition that alters the quality, or quantity, of tears that leak out of your eyes. These tears are made up of three different layers that are balance to keep your eyes nourished and lubricated. If anything changes the balance of these three layers, your tears will evaporate too quickly, which, in turn, will cause your eyes to become chronically puffy and irritated. This can be caused by a combination of age, medications and environmental factors. This can be treated by adding artificial tears, other medications, and consuming more water and other nutrients.

10.What is macular degeneration?

While glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 65, macular degeneration is the leading cause. Unlike glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration is often slow and painless, and there is no cure, although treatment can slow or in some cases keep the process at bay. Macular degeneration is caused by the deterioration of the central portion of the retina, which blocks imaging from the brain to the eye. It is an all too common condition that affects more people than both glaucoma and cataracts combined, and is estimated to affect more than 10 million Americans.

For more information on the health of your eyes or to schedule an appointment, contact Dr. Ghosheh at, 1-888-439-6565, today.

Four Common Myths About Cataracts

You may have heard warning from your parents, or grandparents, about cataracts when you were younger. They may have spoken about how staring into the sun for too long, or not properly shielding your eyes from the elements may cause permanent damage that will lead to cataracts. While there is an element of truth to this, the fact is, your elders were perpetuating certain pervasive myths about cataracts that are not widely understood. That in mind, here are four myths about cataracts, that are commonly believed, and reasons why they are incorrect.

Cataracts Can Grow Back

Its often thought that cataracts can re-grow over time, like other regenerative diseases. However, this is simply not the case. Once a cataract is removed from the eye, it is permanently removed. This misconception probably comes from the fact that it is possible for a separate, secondary cataract to develop in your eye, years after removal. This is due to the membrane, which holds the new lens in your eye, can become cloudy, if it is not cared for properly. Fortunately, this secondary cataract can easily be removed using laser surgery, by making a small hole in the membrane and allowing light to enter through and clear it up.

Cataracts Can Be Removed Using Lasers

While a secondary cataract can be removed using laser surgery, an initial cataract cannot. This is because, unlike the secondary cataract, the initial cataract grows on the actual properties of the lens instead of the surface. As a result, typical cataract surgery requires your natural lens to be removed with a tool called a phaco probe. The natural lens is then replaced with an artificial one that adapts naturally to the eye around it and is called an intraocular lens.

Cataract Symptoms Can Be Reversed

Although it is presumed that laser surgery can reverse the symptoms of cataracts, this is also untrue. Once the cataracts have set in, there is no known treatment that can lessen the effects. However, a well balanced diet, and limited exposure to UV rays, are some of the methods that can keep the cloudiness in your vision at bay, if surgery is not an immediate option.

Cataracts Cannot Be Removed Until They Ripen

While surgery is necessary once cataracts set in, it is often thought that it is best to wait until the cataract hits an advanced stage before it can be removed. Although medical technology was limited in the past, modern advances have allowed for surgery to take place as soon as it begins to affect the quality of your vision and your life.

Dispelling these myths about cataracts only helps create an environment where open discussions can take place on how cataracts affect people and lessen their quality of life. If you are a loved one believe you have any symptoms of cataracts, you should consult Dr. Ghosheh, as soon as possible, to discuss immediate treatment.

How Soon Can I Run After iLasik Eye Surgery?

If you are on the verge of having iLASIK, you’re probably excited that the road ahead will be paved with clear vision and the freedom from contacts or glasses. Safe, effective, and blade-free, it’s an advanced type of laser eye surgery that has a lot of advantages to offer its patients. That being said, people naturally want to know what they can expect after the procedure and how it may impact their routine. So if running is your game, you may be wondering how soon you’ll be able to get back to doing what you love and pounding the pavement.

Hitting The Ground Running

Overall, iLASIK boasts a speedy recovery rate, with most patients returning to work and resuming normal activities, as soon as, the following day. Your eye doctor will provide more exact post-op instructions and restrictions, but as a general rule, many doctors allow jogging and running to be resumed anywhere from one day to one week, after the surgery. However, even when you are given the greenlight to run, you should still proceed with caution and care to safeguard the healing process.

It’s often advised for iLASIK patients to wear protective eyewear during a run to prevent possible injury or trauma. Of course, running isn’t considered a contact sport, but you never can predict certain occurrences like an object flying toward your eye or face. Additionally, the eyewear will help protect your eyes from the UV rays of the sun and hopefully keep you from rubbing your eyes, as well.

Meet With Our Experienced Team of Eye Doctors

Considering everything, iLASIK doesn’t create road blocks when it comes to getting back into a runner’s groove. Rather, it has the potential to help them better enjoy their run, to take in the clear details of the park on a sunny day, or to capture the beauty of a sandy beach.

If you are interested in running the course towards improved eyesight, please contact us at Advanced Eye Medical Group for a consultation or call 1-866-997-2020 for LASIK questions. Located in Mission Viejo, our premier eye center is staffed with an experienced team, of optometrists and ophthalmologists, who are dedicated to assisting patients with their various vision needs. Knowing the impact clear vision can have on the quality of life, we take great pride in helping others achieve it.

Why is iLASIK Better than Regular Lasik Surgery?

When it comes to something as precious as your vision, it’s only natural to want the best. This undeniably remains the case when venturing to improve it with surgery. However, quite frankly, not every vision correction technique is made equal. By comparing iLASIK with traditional LASIK surgery, it’s easy to see that one procedure has several advantages over the other . Here’s a hint; it isn’t LASIK… and here’s why:

iLASIK is Bladeless:

No blades used, need we say more? Probably not, but let’s expand on that anyway. Using a laser system, called IntraLase, iLASIK creates a corneal flap with more precision and safety than LASIK, which uses a small bladed instrument called a microkeratome.

Fewer Complications:

While complications with regular LASIK were fairly rare, the absence of blades, combined with the innovation of advanced technologies, has made iLASIK largely considered the safer of the two. The laser’s exact measurements, capabilities, and predictable outcomes, offer reduced chances of complications such as partial or incomplete corneal flaps.

It’s a Custom-Fit Treatment:

In order to detect the tiniest irregularities and imperfections of the eyes, iLASIK makes a 3D map using WaveScan technology. After the customized flap is created, the map is then utilized when making the appropriate corrections. Not to mention, by being able to treat a wider range of imperfections, such as severe nearsightedness (myopia), iLASIK is possible for a greater amount of people. This, of course, includes those who were not necessarily ideal candidates for traditional LASIK. Overall, it’s a fair to say that iLASIK is a more advanced, more personalized way of improving vision, than that of its predecessor, which is comparatively closer to a one-size fits all technique.

Better Vision Results:

Last, but certainly not least, iLASIK has offered better results, with a majority of patients achieving 20/20 vision, or even better.

Seeing the Benefits of Clearer Vision

Utilized by the United States military and NASA, iLASIK has proven itself to be a highly effective method of vision correction. From precision to safety, the reasons for choosing this procedure are crystal clear, and those for traditional LASIK well, a bit foggy.

To learn more about iLASIK and how it can address your specific vision needs, contact us at Advanced Eye Medical in Orange County. Our expert staff of optometrists and ophthalmologists take pride in helping patients. Say so long to contacts and glasses, and say hello to a clearer world!