How To Properly Remove Stuck Contact Lenses

If you wear contacts, at some point, you might run into the problem of having your contact stuck in your eye, which is unfortunately an excruciating and all too common occurrence. This can happen when you are wearing a soft contact lens that is adjusted to your vision and your lifestyle. However, if the soft contact lens is more moist than the cornea of your eye, then there is a chance that it may get stuck. Fortunately, there are a number of methods that you can use to dislodge a soft contact lens from your eye. Here are three great steps for removing soft contact lenses that get stuck in your eye.

Wash Your Hands Thoroughly

Lack of moisture in your cornea is one of the common ways contacts can get stuck in your eyes. Once you have wet your hand, you can then feel comfortable touching your eye and determining where the soft contact lens is located in your eye. Make sure to use soap and warm water to rid your fingertips of bacteria, and keep your fingers moist, as you fiddle with your eye.

Locate the Lens

After your hands are thoroughly wet, it is now time to find if the lens is stuck in your cornea or off the center of your eye. To determine this, lift up your eyelid and take a look in the mirror. Sometimes, if the lens has moved to the corner of your eye, you will be able to see it straight away. If not, your best bet is to attempt to look in the opposite direction of where you believe the lens has fallen. If your vision is blocked when you look in the opposite direction, it is likely that the lens is the culprit.

Dislodge the Lens

Once you have determined if the lens is stuck in the center of your eye, or off to the center, it will be ready for removal. To remove the lens, you should rinse it, and your eye, for a few seconds with saline solution or multipurpose contact lens solution, to wash it out. Afterwards, close your eye and gently massage your eyelid until you feel the lens start to move. It may take up to 15 minutes for the lens to become re-hydrated, but once its moist, you should be able to take it out as your normally would. If the lens is still stuck in your eye after this, try putting in a fresh contact lens and blink your eye. If done properly, this can help to draw out the stuck lens into the new lens, which can then be easily removed.

If you find that none of these techniques have worked for you, contact doctor Ghosheh, immediately, and have either the doctor of a technician remove the lens for you.

Why Wash Your Hands Before Touching Your Eyes

When you were younger, it was probably emphasized that you should wash your hands before dinner. While that advice should be taken well into your adulthood, there are many other scenarios in which you should be washing your hands. In fact, one of the most important times to wash your hands is before you touch your eyes, particularly, if you are inserting or removing contact lenses. While it’s impossible to keep your hands entirely germ free, washing your hands can often mitigate the amount of bacteria or other dirt and grime that will get into your eyes or contact lenses. That in mind, here are some of the diseases you can avoid and how you should wash your hands to ensure a healthier life and hygienic routine.

Non-purulent Conjunctivitis

Also known as pink eye, non-purulent conjunctivitis can greatly affect your life. Most people tend to deal with non-purulent conjunctivitis at some point, but fortunately it can be easily avoided by practicing proper hygiene and by taking care to wash your hands. Some symptoms of pink eye include itching, red eyes, and some discharge around the edges of your eye.

Bacterial non-purulent conjunctivitis can be highly contagious, and you should take care not to spread it by constantly touching your eyes. Before you infect anyone that you love, you will need to visit an eye doctor—he or she can prescribe some antibacterial eye drops. Your symptoms usually clear within a few days.

How to Wash your Hands to Prevent Disease

Avoiding disease is easy once you know the basics of washing your hands. Most have trouble distinguishing when they should wash their hands, but if you have any doubt, or it has been a few hours, you should consider visiting the nearest sink in order to prevent any infections. Many experts agree that if your hands are visibly soiled, you have touched raw meat, visited the bathroom, or you have blown your nose, you should make sure to take the time to make sure your hands are cleaned.

One mistake that many make is that they don’t wash their hands long enough in order to rid themselves of any germs that might cause disease. You should take the time to thoroughly cover your hands in soap and to hold them under running water while you sing “Mary Had a Little Lamb”. This gives the soap you use adequate time to do its job and to get rid of any lingering infection that you might have picked up going through your day.

A Small Step to a Healthy Life

The health of your eyes is incredibly important for daily living. By taking care to wash your hands and being aware of your hygiene, you can promote a healthier and happier lifestyle for yourself.

Can I Get an Infection From Unclean Contacts?

Although millions of individuals use contact lenses safely everyday, they are not without certain risks, particularly that of an eye infection. The most common cause of eye infections, from contact lenses, is keratitis. Also known as cornea inflammation, Keratitis occurs when the clear tissue on the front of your eye becomes swollen, and can happen if you leave your contact lenses in for an extended period of time. There are other ways that you can contract keratisis, such as dry eyes and injury, but they are broad and can range from herpes, fungus and bacteria, and sometimes unknown factors.

Fungal Keratisis Causes

That being said, the most common form of keratisis is fungal, and is caused by the fungi known as Fusaria. Fusaria are common fungi that can be found in the soil, in water or on the cellulose layer of plants, and is particularly found in warmer climates. Fusaria can develop on contact lenses if they are exposed to excessive moisture or plant residue, whether you are wearing them or not. It can also transfer from your contact lenses into your cornea, if there is an existing superficial injury, such as a cut or scratch.

Fungal Keratisis Symptoms

While fungal kertasis is a serious condition, there are several tell-tale signs that you may have this condition. Symptoms can range from sudden pain in the eye, to excessive tearing or any discharge from your eyes. If you think you have experienced any symptoms of fungal keratisis from your contact lenses, such as eye redness, reduced vision or excessive light sensitivity, you should see an ophthalmologist as soon as possible. Treatment must begin as to prevent blindness or other serious damage to you cornea, and you should also remove and clean your contact lenses, just in case.

Fungal Keratisis Treatment

Once you visit your ophthalmologist, he or she will have several recommendations after they determine if you have fungal keratisis. First among those will be anti fungal eye drops and oral medications, which in most cases will be sufficient to quell your symptoms. However, if the fungal infection is too far along, your ophthalmologist may recommend surgery, and if it is severe enough, you may have to have a corneal transplant. Fortunately, this surgery has a high success rate and will replace the damaged cornea tissue, with healthy cornea, tissue given by a donor.

However, corneal transplant surgery is a last resort and can be avoided if you regularly clean, store and hygienically handle your contact lenses. If you have any questions about this disease, or how you might be affected, you should contact us today for advice, and preventative steps, so you can avoid this serious medical condition.

What Do I Do If My Contact Lens Gets Stuck In My Eye?

If you are a wearer of contacts, at some point you might run into the problem of having your contact stuck in your eye, which is unfortunately an excruciating and all too common occurrence. This can happen when you are wearing a soft contact lens that is adjusted to your vision and your lifestyle. However, if the soft contact lens is more moist than the cornea of your eye, there is a chance that it may get stuck. Fortunately, there are a number of methods that you can use to dislodge a soft contact lens from your eye. Here are three great steps for removing soft contact lenses that get stuck in your eye.

Wash Your Hands Thoroughly

Lack of moisture in your cornea is one of the common ways that contacts can get stuck in your eyes. Once you have wet your hand, you can then feel comfortable touching your eye and determining where the soft contact lens is located in your eye. Make sure to use soap and warm water to rid your fingertips of bacteria, and keep your fingers moist as you fiddle with your eye.

Locate the Lens

After your hands are thoroughly wetted, it is now time to find if the lens is stuck in your cornea or off the center of your eye. To determine this, lift up your eyelid and take a look in the mirror. Sometimes, particularly if the lens has moved to the corner of your eye, you will be able to see it straight away. If not, your best bet is to spot it visually is to attempt to look in the opposite direction of where you believe the lens has fallen. If your vision is blocked when you look in the opposite direction, it is likely that the lens is the culprit.

Dislodge the Lens

Once you have determined if the lens is stuck in the center of your eye, or off to the center, you will be ready for removal. Ito remove the lens, you should rinse it and your eye for a few seconds with saline solution or multipurpose contact lens solution to wash it out. Afterwards, close your eye and gently massage your eyelid until you feel the lens start to move. It may take up to 15 minutes for the lens to become re-hydrated, but once its moist, you should be able to take it out as your normally would. If the lens is still stuck in your eye after this, try putting a fresh contact lens in and blinking. If done properly, this can help to draw out the stuck lens into the new lens, which can then be easily removed.

If you find that none of these techniques have worked for you, give your eye doctor a call immediately and have either the doctor of a technician remove the lens for you.

Filthy Contacts May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

The Dirty Little Secret Your Lenses Aren’t Telling You

Naturally, people desire their eyesight to be clear, good and healthy. Recently, an increased amount of contact lens users have turned to Lasik treatment to improve their vision. While seeking a type of laser vision correction is hardly new, the reason behind it just may be. Stories have been circulating with concerns about a connection between contact lenses and bacterial infections. So, let’s do a little digging and laser in on the facts.

Contact Concerns

According to recent research and studies, bacteria concerns with contacts are not exactly unwarranted. In fact, one study showed that some contact wearers had three times the amount of a specific bacteria than non-contact wearers.

Just thinking about it, this isn’t completely surprising. Contact lenses come into contact. Yes, with the eyes, but often also with the hands and skin. Therefore, it only makes sense that the increased potential for bacterial infections should follow.

The most common infection linked to contacts is called keratitis. Affecting and inflaming the cornea, keratitis ranges in various types such as fungal, bacterial and amoebic. It is a serious complication that can possibly lead to corneal ulcers and impaired vision.

Proper Eye Health & Care

One common reason patients undergo Lasik treatment is because they wish to enjoy clear vision and lower, or even eliminate, their dependency on glasses or contact lenses. In order to reduce the risk of infection, contact wearers should take preventative steps such as:

  • Making sure their hands are clean before inserting lenses
  • Carefully clean, disinfect, and store contacts
  • Avoid showering or swimming with contacts in: bacteria may attach to the lenses and cause infection
  • Never sleep with contacts on

Contact Us to Gain Your Freedom from Contacts with Lasik

When it comes down to it, the potential for a bacterial infection from contact lenses is always a possibility. If you are interested in reducing your dependency on contacts, as well as enjoying clearer corrected vision, contact our laser eye center to schedule a consultation.

Why Contact Lenses May Not be the Best Solution for Sports

One of the leading selling points of contact lenses is the fact that, unlike eyeglasses, they can be worn while playing sports. Contact lenses also offer a wider field of vision than most pairs of glasses, which is helpful when it comes to throwing, catching, kicking, and dodging tackles. When compared to eyeglasses, contact lenses offer a clear competitive advantage, but is it the best solution?

If you are trying to decide between glasses, contacts, or corrective laser surgery for yourself, there are several factors worth considering. Let’s look at the strengths and weaknesses of wearing contacts while playing sports.

 Advantages of Contact lenses for Sports

  • The biggest advantage of contact lenses versus eyeglasses is the improved peripheral vision offered by contacts. For most eyeglass wearers, there is a drop off in clarity in the peripheral field of vision.
  • Wearing glasses during a contact sport can also increase the chances of them breaking, bending, and can seriously threaten the safety of your eyes.
  • You do not have to worry about smudges on your glasses, dirt, or any other substance getting on your glasses!
  • Some, though not all, contact lenses offer protection from ultraviolet radiation, thereby preventing further damage to your eyes.
  • Contact lenses are also able to facilitate sports-related safety equipment much more comfortably than eyeglasses can. After all it is pretty difficult to wear goggles (in hockey or marksmanship, for example) over bulky eyeglasses. Contacts conform quite closely to the eye’s natural form factor, making it easy to wear all types of protective gear.

Disadvantages of Contact Lenses for Sports

Wearing contact lenses for sports does come with its own disadvantages. Ask anyone who wears contacts, sometimes those tiny clear lenses fall out! When you’re playing a full-contact sport, the last thing you want to be concerned about is your lenses. And if you wear lenses to repair your vision for astigmatism, having a lens forcibly ejected from your eye can not only halt your game, but can prove costly when it comes time for replacement. And nobody has time for that!

If your only contact lens option is rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses then you know that merely wearing them can be uncomfortable. That discomfort can result in outright pain on the playing field.

The iLASIK Alternative

If you’re someone who wears contact lenses to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism and you are actively involved in sports, you may be the perfect candidate for iLASIK laser eye surgery. However, not everyone is a candidate for LASIK, so you will need to consult with an ophthalmologist who specializes in laser surgery to see if it’s recommended for your vision.

iLasik might possibly be the best vision correction solution, you will be able to hit the playing field totally unencumbered in a way that neither contact lenses nor eyeglasses can provide and that’s an advantage you simply cannot beat. Correct  the most common vision problems and toss out those corrective lenses.

Four Mistakes you Make with your Contact Lenses

When you first began using contact lenses you were very diligent and kept up with proper cleaning. After some time, these necessary steps are forgotten and you became careless. If you are committing these mistakes it is time to consider Lasik surgery.

You Use Water As a Solution

Water is not a disinfectant solution; never mix lenses with water. Not only is water not the cleanest solution, but it can cause lenses to change shape, swell, and stick to your eye. Avoid showering or swimming to prevent your lenses from coming into contact with water.

You “Top off” Your Lens Case

Instead of emptying and cleaning your case out you simply just add more solution to what has been laying in your case. Since half the solution has been sitting in the case adding new solution will only decrease its ability to disinfect the lenses.

You Don’t Clean Your Case

Always clean out your case after every use. Empty the case out and use small amount of solution to clean it out, and then let it dry. When you do not clean your case a thin layer of biofilm begins to form at the bottom, increasing your chances of an eye infection.

You Don’t Wash Your Hands

Always wash your hands before touching your lenses or before touching your eyes. It may seem obvious, but many people do not do it! Bacteria can linger on your hands and finger tips which can easily cause an infection.

Contact lenses can be a burden for many and without proper maintenance they can easily cause problems in your eyes. Many individuals decide to undergo Lasik eye surgery to improve their vision and get rid of their unhygienic contact lenses. Contact Advanced Medical Group to schedule your Lasik procedure and get rid of those contact lenses for good!